Little Golden Books
I know that’s not a single title, but who could choose from the treasure trove? Poky Little Puppy, the Little Red Hen. The Friendly Book, Little LuLu and her Magic Tricks, The Three Bears, Dr. Dan the Bandage Man, Nurse Nancy, the eccentric Lucky Mrs. Ticklefeather.  
In the 1950s, when I was a child, children’s literature was not as prolific or available as it is today. These simple stories, some written by now-famous authors such as Margaret Wise Brown, appealed to all children and were often illustrated by quality artists — Eloise Wilkin, Tiber Gergely, Rajankovsky.
The Golden Books were affordable even to a farm family of four children like mine — priced at twenty-five to twenty-nine cents each, available at drug stores, groceries and dime stores. On Fridays, “shopping days” at my childhood home, my mother would return with groceries, notions, AND a Little Golden Book. She read to us every evening, and instilled in all of us a love of stories and books. 
Now, as an early childhood teacher, I know (there has been documentation!) that the single most important factor in raising a reader is reading to that child.
My early experiences with the bright, engaging storybooks in this series were the key to opening my heart to books forever, and sharing my love for stories with future generations. Through picture books, I hope to stir my young students’ imaginations, curiosity and creativity and help create lifelong readers.

—Sharon Dempsey has been a full-time teacher at Free To Be Child Care Center since 1986. Sharon has presented at national, state and local early childhood conferences. She is active in the Atlantic Bay Association for the Education of Young Children. Currently she resides in Laureldale with her husband and two daughters.

Little Golden Books

I know that’s not a single title, but who could choose from the treasure trove? Poky Little Puppy, the Little Red Hen. The Friendly Book, Little LuLu and her Magic Tricks, The Three Bears, Dr. Dan the Bandage Man, Nurse Nancy, the eccentric Lucky Mrs. Ticklefeather.  

In the 1950s, when I was a child, children’s literature was not as prolific or available as it is today. These simple stories, some written by now-famous authors such as Margaret Wise Brown, appealed to all children and were often illustrated by quality artists — Eloise Wilkin, Tiber Gergely, Rajankovsky.

The Golden Books were affordable even to a farm family of four children like mine — priced at twenty-five to twenty-nine cents each, available at drug stores, groceries and dime stores. On Fridays, “shopping days” at my childhood home, my mother would return with groceries, notions, AND a Little Golden Book. She read to us every evening, and instilled in all of us a love of stories and books.

Now, as an early childhood teacher, I know (there has been documentation!) that the single most important factor in raising a reader is reading to that child.

My early experiences with the bright, engaging storybooks in this series were the key to opening my heart to books forever, and sharing my love for stories with future generations. Through picture books, I hope to stir my young students’ imaginations, curiosity and creativity and help create lifelong readers.


—Sharon Dempsey has been a full-time teacher at Free To Be Child Care Center since 1986. Sharon has presented at national, state and local early childhood conferences. She is active in the Atlantic Bay Association for the Education of Young Children. Currently she resides in Laureldale with her husband and two daughters.

15 January 2013 ·

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    Why we love Little Golden Books
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